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FUNDAMENTALLY-DRIVEN SPECIALIST ACTIVE FUNDS

PRINCIPAL RISKS OF INVESTING IN THE FUND

CENTRE AMERICAN SELECT EQUITY FUND

The loss of your money is a principal risk of investing in the Fund. Investments in the Fund are subject to investment risks, including the possible loss of some or the entire principal amount invested. The Fund’s shares, like other mutual fund shares, are not deposits or obligations of, or guaranteed or endorsed by, any bank, and are not insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the Federal Reserve Board, or any other agency of the U.S. government. There can be no assurance that the Fund will be successful in meeting its investment objective. Generally, the Fund will be subject to the following principal risks:

Common Stock Risk. The value of common stocks held by the Fund might decrease in response to the activities of a single company or in response to general market or economic conditions. If this occurs, the value of the Fund may also decrease.

Market Risk. Market risk refers to the possibility that the value of securities held by the Fund may decline due to daily fluctuations in the securities markets. Asset prices change daily as a result of many factors, including developments affecting the condition of individual companies, the sector or industries in which they operate, and the market in general. The price of a security or other instrument may even be affected by factors unrelated to the value or condition of its issuer, such as changes in interest rates, national and international economic and/or political conditions and general market conditions. In a declining stock market, security prices for all companies (including those in the Fund’s portfolio) may decline regardless of any company’s long-term prospects. The Fund’s performance per share will change daily in response to such factors.

Risks of Investing in Undervalued Securities. Undervalued securities are, by definition, out of favor with investors, and there is no way to predict when, if ever, the securities may return to favor or achieve the Adviser’s expectations with respect to the price of the security.

Sector Risk. To the extent that the Fund focuses its investments in the securities issued by companies in a particular market sector, the Fund will be subject to the market or economic factors affecting such sector, including adverse economic, business, political, regulatory or environmental developments, to a greater extent than if the Fund’s investments were more diversified among various different sectors.

Derivative Risk. Loss may result from the Fund’s use of derivatives. The value of derivatives in which the Fund may invest may rise or fall more rapidly than other investments. Other risks of investments in derivatives include imperfect correlation between the value of these instruments and the underlying assets; risks of default by the other party to a non-exchange traded derivative transaction; risk that the transactions may result in losses that offset gains in portfolio positions; and risks that the derivative transactions may not be liquid. Derivatives may contain “inherent” leverage because derivative contracts may give rise to an obligation on the part of the Fund for future payment or liabilities that are larger than the initial margin or premiums required to establish such positions. Combined with the volatility of derivatives prices, the leveraged nature of derivatives trading could cause the Fund to sustain large and sudden losses.

Portfolio Turnover Risk. The Adviser will sell portfolio securities when it believes that it is in the interests of the Fund and its shareholders to do so. Tax consequences are considered; however, the decision to sell a security is first and foremost an investment-driven one. As portfolio turnover may involve paying brokerage commissions and other transaction costs, there could be additional expenses for the Fund. High rates of portfolio turnover may also result in the realization of short-term capital gains and losses. Any distributions resulting from such gains will be considered ordinary income for federal income tax purposes.

Investment Adviser Risk. The Adviser’s implementation of the Fund’s strategy may fail to produce the intended results. The Adviser’s ability to choose suitable investments has a significant impact on the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective.

Political/Economic Risk. Changes in economic and tax policies, interest rates, high inflation rates, government instability, war or other political or economic actions or factors may have an adverse effect on the Fund’s investments.

Regulatory Risk. Governmental and regulatory actions, including tax law changes, may have unexpected or adverse consequences on particular markets, strategies, or investments, including the liquidity of investments. These actions and other developments may impact the Fund’s ability to invest or remain invested in certain securities and other assets. Legislation or regulation may also change the way in which the Fund itself is regulated. The Adviser cannot predict the effects of any new governmental regulation that may be implemented on the ability of the Fund to invest in certain assets, and there can be no assurance that any new governmental regulation will not adversely affect the Fund’s ability to achieve its investment objective.

CENTRE ACTIVE U.S. TREASURY FUND

The Fund’s shares, like other mutual fund shares, are not deposits or obligations of, or guaranteed or endorsed by, any bank, and are not insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the Federal Reserve Board, or any other agency of the U.S. government. Before investing in the Fund, an investor should carefully consider his/her own investment goals, the amount of time available to leave money invested and the amount of risk he/she is willing to take. There can be no assurance that the Fund will be successful in meeting its investment objective.

Credit Risk. Credit risk is the risk that the issuer of a debt security will fail to repay principal and interest on the security when due, and that there could be a decline or perception of a decline in the credit quality of a security. The degree of risk for a particular security, including U.S. Treasury notes and bonds, may be reflected in its credit rating. There is the possibility that the credit rating of a fixed income security may be downgraded after purchase, which may adversely affect the value of the security. Investments in fixed income securities with lower ratings tend to have a higher probability that an issuer will default or fail to meet its payment obligations. The default of a single holding could have the potential to adversely affect the Fund's net asset value. Although the Fund intends to invest only in high quality debt securities, primarily U.S. Treasury securities backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Treasury, it is possible that a security held by the Fund could have its credit rating downgraded or could default.

Interest Rate Risk. Changes in interest rates will affect the value of the Fund’s investments in fixed income securities. When interest rates rise, the value of investments in fixed income securities tends to fall, and this decrease in value may not be offset by higher income from new investments. Interest rate risk is generally greater for fixed income securities with longer maturities or durations.

Duration Risk. Duration is a measure of the sensitivity of a security's price to changes in interest rates. The longer a security's duration, the more sensitive it will be to changes in interest rates. Accordingly, a longer average portfolio duration will be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than a portfolio with a shorter average duration. By way of example, the price of a bond portfolio with duration of five years would be expected to fall approximately 5% if interest rates rose by one percentage point.

Income Risk. Income risk is the risk that the income received by the Fund may decrease as a result of falling interest rates.

Fixed-Income Securities Risk. Fixed income securities are obligations of the issuer of the securities to make payments of principal and/or interest on future dates. Fixed income securities include, but are not limited to, securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government, its agencies or government-sponsored enterprises, corporate debt securities issued by U.S. and non-U.S. entities, mortgage-backed and other asset-backed securities, structured notes and inflation-indexed bonds issued both by governments and corporations. Fixed income securities are generally subject to the risk that the issuer will be unable to meet principal and interest payments, and the risk of price volatility due to a variety of factors, including interest rate sensitivity, market perception of the issuer’s creditworthiness and general market conditions. As interest rates rise, the value of fixed income securities typically declines. A period of volatility in economic conditions or monetary policy leading to rising interest rates could adversely affect the market of these securities and reduce the Fund's ability to sell them. To the extent that the Fund is invested in fixed-rate Treasury obligations, the return on, and value of, an investment may fluctuate.

TIPS-Related Risks. TIPS are issued with a fixed interest rate and a fixed maturity date, but their principal value will change, as the U.S. Treasury raises or lowers such value each month to keep pace with inflation. Consequently, the coupon payments made to investors will also vary. Although generally considered a low-risk investment because they are backed by the U.S. government and have a fixed interest rate, TIPS are long-duration assets, sensitive to changes in interest rates and, in the short term, can experience substantial fluctuations in price. In addition, TIPS could lose value during protracted periods of deflation.

Derivative Risk. Loss may result from the Fund’s use of derivatives, including exchange-traded futures on bond indices or U.S. Treasury notes and bonds. The value of derivatives in which the Fund may invest may rise or fall more rapidly than other investments. Other risks of investments in derivatives include imperfect correlation between the value of these instruments and the underlying assets; risks of default by the other party to a non-exchange traded derivative transaction; risk that the transactions may result in losses that offset gains in portfolio positions; and risks that the derivative transactions may not be liquid. Derivatives may contain “inherent” leverage because derivative contracts may give rise to an obligation on the part of the Fund for future payment or liabilities that are larger than the initial margin or premiums required to establish such positions. Combined with the volatility of derivatives prices, the leveraged nature of derivatives trading could cause the Fund to sustain large and sudden losses.

Investment Adviser Risk. The Adviser’s implementation of the Fund’s strategy may fail to produce the intended results. The Adviser’s ability to choose suitable investments has a significant impact on the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objectives. Furthermore, because the Fund seeks returns relating to changes in interest rates over time and management of duration, the Fund’s performance may be more adversely affected than that of other funds if the Adviser’s interest rate forecasts are incorrect.

You could lose money by investing in the Fund.

CENTRE GLOBAL INFRASTRUCTURE FUND

The loss of your money is a principal risk of investing in the Fund. Investments in the Fund are subject to investment risks, including the possible loss of some or the entire principal amount invested. The Fund’s shares, like other mutual fund shares, are not deposits or obligations of, or guaranteed or endorsed by, any bank, and are not insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the Federal Reserve Board, or any other agency of the U.S. Government. There can be no assurance that the Fund will be successful in meeting its investment objective. Generally, the Fund will be subject to the following principal risks:

Common Stock Risk. The value of common stocks held by the Fund might decrease in response to the activities of a single company or in response to general market or economic conditions. If this occurs, the value of the Fund may also decrease.

Market Risk. Market risk refers to the possibility that the value of securities held by the Fund may decline due to daily fluctuations in the securities markets. Asset prices change daily as a result of many factors, including developments affecting the condition of individual companies, the sector or industries in which they operate, and the market in general. The price of a security or other instrument may even be affected by factors unrelated to the value or condition of its issuer, such as changes in interest rates, national and international economic and/or political conditions and general market conditions. In a declining stock market, security prices for all companies (including those in the Fund’s portfolio) may decline regardless of any company’s long-term prospects. The Fund’s performance per share will change daily in response to such factors.

Infrastructure-Related Company Investment Risk. The Fund’s investments in infrastructure-related companies will expose the Fund, and make it more susceptible, to adverse economic or regulatory occurrences affecting those companies. Infrastructure-related companies may be subject to a variety of factors that, individually or collectively, may adversely affect their business or operations, including general or local economic conditions and political developments, changes in government spending on infrastructure projects, general changes in market sentiment towards infrastructure assets, high interest costs in connection with capital construction and improvement programs, high degrees of leverage, difficulty in raising capital, costs associated with compliance with changes in environmental and other regulations, the deregulation of a particular industry or sector, environmental problems, technological changes, surplus capacity, casualty losses, threat of terrorist attacks, increased competition from other providers of services, uncertainties concerning the availability of fuel at reasonable prices, and the effects of energy conservation policies. In addition, infrastructure-related companies may also be affected by governmental regulation of rates charged to customers, service interruption due to environmental, operational or other challenges and the imposition of special tariffs and changes in tax laws and accounting standards. A downturn in these companies would have a larger impact on the Fund than on a mutual fund that does not focus its investments in such companies.

Sector Risk. The Fund’s investments in securities issued by infrastructure-related companies may expose the Fund to the risks affecting a particular market sector, such as utilities, telecommunication services, energy or industrials. To the extent that the Fund’s investments are focused in such a sector, the Fund will be subject to the market or economic factors affecting such sector, including adverse economic, business, political, regulatory or environmental developments, to a greater extent than if the Fund’s investments were more diversified among various different sectors.

Fixed Income Securities Risk. Fixed income securities are obligations of the issuer of the securities to make payments of principal and/or interest on future dates. Fixed income securities include, but are not limited to, securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government, its agencies or government-sponsored enterprises, corporate debt securities issued by U.S. and non-U.S. entities, mortgage-backed and other asset-backed securities, structured notes and inflation-indexed bonds issued both by governments and corporations. Fixed income securities are generally subject to the risk that the issuer will be unable to meet principal and interest payments, and the risk of price volatility due to a variety of factors, including interest rate sensitivity, market perception of the issuer’s creditworthiness and general market conditions. A period of economic conditions or monetary policy volatility leading to rising interest rates could adversely affect the market for these securities and reduce the Fund's ability to sell them. As interest rates rise, the value of fixed income securities typically declines.

Foreign and Emerging Market Securities Risk. The Fund will invest in foreign securities, which involve investment risks different from those associated with domestic securities. Foreign markets, particularly emerging markets, may be less liquid, more volatile, and subject to less government supervision than domestic markets. There may be difficulties enforcing contractual obligations, and it may take more time for trades to clear and settle. The value of the Fund’s investments may decline because of factors affecting a particular issuer, and/or factors affecting foreign markets and issuers generally, such as unfavorable or unsuccessful government actions, reduction of government or central bank support and political or financial instability. Lack of information may also affect the value of these securities. To the extent the Fund focuses its investments in a single country or only a few countries in a particular geographic region, economic, political, regulatory or other conditions affecting such country or region may have a greater impact on Fund performance relative to a more geographically diversified fund. The Fund’s investments in ADRs and GDRs entail similar investment risks to direct ownership of foreign securities traded outside the U.S.

Currency Risk. Currency risk is the chance that changes in currency exchange rates will negatively affect securities denominated in, and/or companies receiving revenues in, foreign currencies. Adverse changes in currency exchange rates (relative to the U.S. dollar) may erode or reverse any potential gains from a portfolio’s investment in securities denominated in a foreign currency or may widen existing losses. Currency gains and losses could occur regardless of the performance of the underlying investment.

Credit Risk. Credit risk is the risk that the issuer of a debt security will fail to repay principal and interest on the security when due, and that there could be a decline or perception of a decline in the credit quality of a security. The degree of risk for a particular security may be reflected in its credit rating. There is the possibility that the credit rating of a fixed income security may be downgraded after purchase, which may adversely affect the value of the security. Investments in fixed income securities with lower ratings tend to have a higher probability that an issuer will default or fail to meet its payment obligations. The default of a single holding could have the potential to adversely affect the Fund's net asset value. It is possible that a security held by the Fund could have its credit rating downgraded or could default.

Interest Rate Risk. Changes in interest rates will affect the value of the Fund’s investments in fixed income securities. When interest rates rise, the value of investments in fixed income securities tends to fall, and this decrease in value may not be offset by higher income from new investments. Interest rate risk is generally greater for fixed income securities with longer maturities or durations.

Maturity Risk. Longer-term securities generally have greater price fluctuations and are more sensitive to interest rate changes than shorter-term securities. Therefore, the Fund may experience greater price fluctuations when it holds securities with longer maturities.

Income Risk. Income risk is the risk that the income received by the Fund may decrease as a result of falling interest rates or dividend yields.

Municipal Obligations. The Fund may invest in municipal obligations, including securities of states, territories and possessions, of the U.S. and the District of Columbia, and their political subdivisions, agencies and instrumentalities (collectively, “Municipal Obligations”), the interest on which is exempt from federal income tax. Municipal Obligations include general obligation bonds (which are secured by the issuer’s pledge of its faith, credit and taxing power for the payment of principal and interest), revenue bonds (which are payable from the revenues derived from a particular facility or class of facilities or, in some cases, from the proceeds of a special excise or other specific revenue source, but not from the general taxing power of the issuer) and notes (which are short-term instruments issued by municipalities or agencies and are sold in anticipation of a bond sale, collection of taxes or receipt of other revenues). To the extent that the Fund invests more of its assets in a particular issuer’s municipal securities, the Fund is vulnerable to events adversely affecting that issuer, including economic, political and regulatory occurrences, court decisions, terrorism and catastrophic natural disasters. The Fund's investments in certain municipal securities with principal and interest payments that are made from the revenues of a specific project or facility, and not general tax revenues, may have increased risks. For example, factors affecting the project or facility, such as local business or economic conditions, could have a significant effect on the project's ability to make payments of principal and interest on these securities. From time to time, proposals have been introduced before Congress for the purpose of restricting or eliminating the federal income tax exemption for interest on Municipal Obligations.

Liquidity Risk. Liquidity risk occurs when an investment becomes difficult to purchase or sell. Some assets held by the Fund may be impossible or difficult to sell, particularly during times of market turmoil. The Fund may also face liquidity risk as a result of, among other factors, low trading volumes, legal or contractual restrictions on resale, and substantial redemptions of the Fund’s shares.

Convertible Securities Risk. The market value of a convertible security performs like that of a regular debt security; that is, if market interest rates rise, the value of a convertible security usually falls. In addition, convertible securities are subject to the risk that the issuer will not be able to pay interest or dividends when due, and their market value may change based on changes in the issuer’s credit rating or the market’s perception of the issuer’s creditworthiness. Since it derives a portion of its value from the common stock into which it may be converted, a convertible security is also subject to the same types of market and issuer risks that apply to the underlying common stock.

MLP Investment Risk. An MLP that invests in a particular industry (e.g. oil, gas and consumable fuels) may be adversely affected by detrimental economic events within that industry. As a partnership, an MLP may be subject to less regulation (and less protection for investors) under state laws than corporations. In addition, MLPs may be subject to state taxation in certain jurisdictions, which may reduce the amount of income an MLP pays to its investors, such as the Fund.

Investment Adviser Risk. The Adviser’s implementation of the Fund’s strategy may fail to produce the intended results. The Adviser’s ability to choose suitable investments has a significant impact on the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objectives.

Portfolio Turnover Risk. The Adviser will sell portfolio securities when it believes that it is in the interests of the Fund and its shareholders to do so. Tax consequences are considered; however, the decision to sell a security is first and foremost an investment-driven one. As portfolio turnover may involve paying brokerage commissions and other transaction costs, there could be additional expenses for the Fund. High rates of portfolio turnover may also result in the realization of short-term capital gains and losses. Any distributions resulting from such gains will be considered ordinary income for federal income tax purposes.

Political/Economic Risk. Changes in economic and tax policies, interest rates, high inflation rates, government instability, war or other political or economic actions or factors may have an adverse effect on the Fund’s investments.

Regulatory Risk. Governmental and regulatory actions, including tax law changes, may have unexpected or adverse consequences on particular markets, strategies, or investments, including the liquidity of investments. These actions and other developments may impact the Fund’s ability to invest or remain invested in certain securities and other assets. Legislation or regulation may also change the way in which the Fund itself is regulated. The Adviser cannot predict the effects of any new governmental regulation that may be implemented on the ability of the Fund to invest in certain assets, and there can be no assurance that any new governmental regulation will not adversely affect the Fund’s ability to achieve its investment objective.

Small-Cap and Mid-Cap Securities Risk. The Fund may invest in securities of small-capitalization (“small-cap”) and mid-capitalization (“mid-cap”) companies. Investing in such companies involves greater volatility than investing in larger and more established companies. Small-cap and mid-cap companies can be subject to more abrupt or erratic share price changes than larger, more established companies. Securities of small-cap and mid-cap companies have limited market liquidity, may be traded in volumes that are lower than are typical of larger company securities, and their prices may be more volatile.

New Fund Risk. The Fund is newly organized and has no operating history. The Fund may not be successful in implementing its investment strategy or may fail to attract sufficient assets under management to realize economies of scale, either of which could result in the Fund being liquidated at any time without shareholder approval and at a time that may not be favorable for all shareholders.

ADDITIONAL INVESTMENT POLICIES AND RISKS

An investment in the Centre American Select Equity Fund (the “American Equity Fund”), Centre Active U.S. Treasury Fund (the “Treasury Fund”), and the Centre Global Infrastructure Fund (the “Global Infrastructure Fund”) (each, a “Fund” and collectively, the “Funds”) should not be considered a complete investment program. Whether a Fund is an appropriate investment for an investor will depend largely on his or her financial resources and individual investment goals and objectives. Investors who engage in short-term trading or other speculative strategies and styles will not find the Funds to be appropriate investment vehicles if they want to invest in the Funds for a short period of time.

General. A Fund’s portfolio may be exposed to a variety of securities, including, as applicable, common stocks, preferred stocks, fixed income securities, securities in other investment companies and/or cash. To the extent that a Fund invests in common stock, such investments may include investments in exchange-listed equities issued by companies across various industries, sectors and market capitalizations. To the extent that a Fund is exposed to preferred stock, such investments may be represented by investments made when the attributes of a particular company’s preferred stock is superior, in terms of total return (dividends plus capital appreciation), to the common shares of the same company.

A Fund may also invest in derivatives, cash management instruments and other instruments to help manage interest rate exposure or sensitivity compared to the stock market, hedge or protect a Fund’s underlying assets, or enhance returns. A Fund may be exposed to exchange-traded derivative products, such as exchange-traded futures and options that are fully collateralized by cash or securities, for temporary cash management or investment transition purposes, or to hedge the risks of existing positions or overall capital protection.

Management. Each Fund is actively managed and could experience losses if the judgment of the Adviser about markets, interest rates or particular investments proves to be incorrect. There can be no guarantee that the investment decisions of the Adviser will produce the desired results. Additionally, the Adviser may be limited by legislative, regulatory, or tax developments in connection with its management of a Fund.

Temporary Defensive Positions and Cash Management. A Fund may, under unusual circumstances, deviate from its investment objective and principal investment strategies and take temporary defensive positions in an attempt to respond to adverse market, economic, political, or other conditions. During such circumstances, a Fund may hold up to 100% of its portfolio in cash or cash equivalent positions. In the event that a Fund, or any investment company in which a Fund invests, takes a temporary defensive position, the Fund may not be able to achieve its investment objective. A Fund may also use cash management instruments and other instruments to help manage interest rate duration or to protect the Fund’s assets or enhance returns.

Derivative Risk. One or more Funds may use derivatives, such as exchange-traded options and futures, that are related to stock market or bond indices, foreign exchange, fixed income or other securities or be exposed to exchange-traded derivative products. Loss may result from a Fund’s investments in exchange-traded futures and options. The value of derivatives in which a Fund may invest may rise or fall more rapidly than other investments.

The use of derivatives, such as futures and options, can lead to losses, including those magnified by leverage, particularly when derivatives are used to enhance return rather than mitigate risk. Correlation risk is the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. Certain derivative instruments may be difficult to sell when the Adviser believes it would be appropriate to do so.

Losses in a Fund’s derivative investments could result in a Fund being called upon to meet obligations in an amount more than the principal amount invested in a derivative instrument or in excess to that Fund’s net asset value, which could leave the Fund with no assets or insufficient assets to carry on operations, and could, as a result, cause the Fund to wind down its operations. A Fund’s use of derivatives may also increase the amount of taxes payable by shareholders.

Risks Related to Investing in Other Investment Companies. Each of the American Select Equity Fund, the Treasury Fund and the Global Infrastructure Fund may invest up to 10% of its net assets in other investment companies, such as ETFs and closed-end funds. These Funds will not invest in securities of an investment company (or any series thereof) or of a registered unit investment trust in reliance on Section 12(d)(1)(G) of the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”), or on Section 12(d)(1)(F) of the 1940 Act. Except as otherwise provided herein, the Funds may invest their cash holdings in affiliated or non-affiliated money market funds as part of a cash sweep program, and may purchase unlimited shares of affiliated or non-affiliated money market funds and of other funds managed by the Adviser, whether registered or unregistered entities, as permitted by the 1940 Act and rules promulgated thereunder and/or an SEC exemptive order.

To the extent that a Fund invests in other investment companies, your cost of investing in that Fund will generally be higher than the cost of investing directly in such other investment company shares. You may indirectly bear fees and expenses charged by the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests in addition to the Fund’s direct fees and expenses. Furthermore, these types of investments by a Fund could affect the timing, amount and character of distributions to you and therefore may increase the amount of taxes payable by you.

Growth Style. A Fund may seek to invest in companies that, in the view of the Adviser, have potential for growth. Securities of companies perceived to be “growth” companies may be more volatile than other stocks and may involve special risks. If the perceived growth potential of a company is not realized, then the securities purchased by a Fund may not perform as expected and that Fund’s return will be reduced. A Fund’s performance may be adversely affected by its investment in growth stocks.

Value Style. A Fund may, at times, have an investment style that emphasizes “value stocks,” which means that the stocks trade at less than the prices at which the Adviser believes they would trade if the market reflected all factors relating to the issuers’ worth. A value investment style involves the risk that a stock’s price may not increase as expected, and may even decline in value. Undervalued securities are, by definition, out of favor with investors, and there is no way to predict when, if ever, the securities may return to favor or achieve the Adviser’s expectations with respect to the price of the security. To the extent that the performance of a Fund is adversely affected by its investment in value stocks, Fund performance may be negatively affected as a result.

Risks of Investing in Real Estate Investment Trusts. A Fund may, at times, invest in real estate investment trust (“REIT”) securities of a diversified nature (both commercial and residential) if the issuers are members of the S&P 500 Index or possess similar market capitalization characteristics (greater than $3.0 billion) and trading volume attributes. REITs are collective investment vehicles which are designed to invest in real estate. A Fund may also invest in exchange-traded notes (“ETNs”) and ETFs that have returns linked to REIT indices. An investment in REITs is subject to the risks associated with owning real estate and with the real estate industry generally, including difficulties in valuing and disposing of real estate; the risk of declines in real estate values and economic conditions; possible adverse changes in the climate for real estate; environmental liability risks; the risk that property taxes and operating expenses will increase; possible adverse changes in zoning laws; the risks of casualty or condemnation losses, rent limitations and adverse changes in interest rates and the credit markets; and the risk of pre-payment by borrowers. In addition, a REIT may default on its obligations or go bankrupt. To the extent that the Fund invests in REITs, the Fund will indirectly bear its proportionate share of expenses, including management fees, paid by each REIT in which it invests, in addition to the expenses of the Fund.

Small-Cap and Mid-Cap Securities Risk. A Fund may, at times, invest in securities of small-capitalization (“small-cap”) and mid-capitalization (“mid-cap”) companies. Investing in such companies involves greater volatility than investing in larger and more established companies. Small-cap and mid-cap companies can be subject to more abrupt or erratic share price changes than larger, more established companies. Securities of small-cap and mid-cap companies have limited market liquidity, and their prices may be more volatile.

Preferred Stock. A Fund may, at times, invest in preferred stocks when the attributes of a particular company’s preferred stock is superior, in terms of total return (dividends plus capital appreciation), to the common shares of the same company. Preferred stock is subject to many of the risks associated with debt securities, including interest rate risk. In addition, preferred stock may not pay a dividend, an issuer may suspend payment of dividends on preferred stock at any time, and in certain situations an issuer may call or redeem its preferred stock or convert it to common stock. To the extent a Fund invests a substantial portion of its assets in convertible preferred stocks, declining common stock values may also cause the value of the Fund’s investments to decline.

Liquidity Risk. Liquidity risk occurs when an investment becomes difficult to purchase or sell. A Fund may face liquidity risk as a result of, among other factors, low trading volumes, legal or contractual restrictions on resale, substantial redemptions of the Fund’s shares and, with respect to fixed income securities, rising interest rates and lower a decreasing capacity of dealers in the secondary market to make markets in such securities. Liquidity risk generally increases (meaning that securities become more illiquid) as the number, or relative need, of investors seeking to liquidate in a given market increases.

Political/Economic Risk. Changes in economic and tax policies, high inflation rates, government instability, war or other political or economic actions or factors may have an adverse effect on the investments of the Funds.

Change of Investment Strategy. Each Fund has a policy to invest, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of the value of its “assets” in certain types of investments suggested by its name (the “80% Policy”). The 80% Policy is a non-fundamental investment policy that can be changed by a Fund upon 60 days’ prior written notice to shareholders. Each Fund must comply with its 80% Policy at the time the Fund invests its assets. Accordingly, when the Fund no longer meets the 80% requirement as a result of circumstances beyond its control, such as changes in the value of portfolio holdings, it would not have to sell its holdings, but any new investments it makes would need to be consistent with its 80% Policy.

Tax Treatment. For an investment in a Fund to qualify for favorable tax treatment as a regulated investment company, certain requirements under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (the “Code”), including asset diversification and income requirements, must be met. If a Fund were to fail to qualify as a regulated investment company under the Code, the Fund would be liable for federal, and possibly state, corporate taxes on its taxable income and gains.

An investor should consider the investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses of the Funds carefully before investing. To obtain a prospectus containing this and other information, please call 1-855-298-4236 or download the Centre American Select Equity Fund Prospectus, Centre Active U.S. Treasury Fund Prospectus, or Centre Global Infrastructure Fund Prospectus. Read the prospectus carefully before you invest. Click here for fund holdings. Holdings are subject to change.
An investment in the Funds involves risk, including loss of principal.
Centre Funds are distributed by ALPS Distributors, Inc. Centre Asset Management, LLC is not affiliated to ALPS Distributors, Inc.
Diversification does not eliminate the risk of experiencing investment losses.

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